Automatic Geek

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OurGWT Leader in Russia Lior Skaler recently came across someone promoting Automatic Geek – a subscription based software & support program for your computer to keep it safe and clean, that is promoting itself using a binary network marketing plan. You can buy a $20/50/100/200 initial package, and then $20/month support on the top package. The first 3 have no residual income.

http://www.automaticgeek.com/index.php

In essence its a low paying 1/3-2/3 binary system with a low cost, high-margin product that while it sounds good in theory, is risky in practice.

The main differences from our plan are:

– looks like you have freedom to place people anywhere in your downline (like Usana), not just on the outside legs, which encourages you to “help” the inside legs with sponsorship, which gets you to play favourites and not create momentum in your outside legs.

– only the top package earns residual – and you have only a 7 day upgrade window

– early on all the money is on the signup bonuses for the particular packages… the fact that 50% of the cost of doing it is paid in bonuses is dangerous from a regulatory perspective – 100% markup on a service.

– monthly autoship (“support for 1 computer”) is $20, which is 20 points – so that takes a LOT of people to build a real residual – 30 one side, 60 on the other to earn 1 cycle… but of course 1 cycle pays for 5 months so your break even is only 18 people, 6/12 – but you’ll only get paid every 5 months to pay for your “autoship”

– residual payout is $100 USD for 1800 points, on a strict 600-1200 1/3 – 2/3, which is a 5.55% payout on the volume
– with a 50K maximum per week per center, noone will ever get to a 2nd center (placed above them like Isagenix)

– higher matching bonus potential requires sponsoring 6/12/18 reps personally at the higher package, with a max in each leg

Pluses are:
– it is a binary with no flushing
– cycle is not TOO high in the grand scheme of things, but its pretty high considering it takes 90 people on autoship, or 9 of the highest package to make a cycle

If someone hacked their system that would be very dangerous, because lots of random people are giving you access to their computer. That’s pretty scary actually.

So all in all, its a low paying system based on a product that many people might find useful, or useless, but would take a little convincing that its safe. I wouldn’t want someone having unlimited access to my computer – who are those people and can we trust them?